On the Eve of an Adventure

I’m about to embark on a grand adventure, and I feel almost like one of my own romance novel heroines!

Tomorrow marks the beginning of my Wild West Irish Tour of Clare, Connemara and Galway, and I am psyched.

The West of Ireland is near and dear to my heart. Its ancient beauty, incredible landscape and mysticism have always fascinated me, so much so that when I wrote my first novel, I set my fictitious Irish village of Ballycashel on its wild, wind-swept coast.

As an author, I always have several projects on the go. At the moment, I’m writing a Christmas novella, plotting two stories—one for my Claddagh Series, the other for my Wild Geese stories—and researching an entirely new series.

This trip couldn’t have come at a better time!

Micheal Lynch, the hero of my Christmas novella, must make a visit to the Aran island of Inis Oirr, coincidentally one of the places I’ll visit on this tour, though I didn’t know that when I plotted that part of the story. What better way to be able to describe the place and the people than to visit the location?

We also visit Bunratty Castle and Folk Park on this tour. Again, excellent research. My next two stories will be set in 19th Century Ireland, and the Folk Park is a traditional village of the time, with cottages, a doctor, and of course, a pub. A perfect setting for my stories, and a chance to speak to some of the people from that era. And perhaps the setting for the Cork village near Skibbereen where Fiona MacDermott searches for her family.

When I visited the castle in 2009 with my family, I was mainly interested in the Folk Park. This time, though, it’s the castle that will capture my interest. It’s a 15th Century tower house, and I think it will be a research goldmine for the new series.

This series is a bit of a departure for me. It’s a Medieval fantasy historical romance series, with a lot of magic and mythology mixed in. The setting will be a kingdom based loosely on the magical land of Tír na Nóg, the Land of the Ever Young, and the ancient kingdom of Tara (which I was lucky enough to visit after my WWIT Signature Tour last summer). The castle, as well as the other sites we visit, will no doubt appear—in one form or another—in all of the stories.

I’m actively plotting the story that will eventually become Book 8 in my Claddagh Series, and I know some of the places we visit—and maybe some of the people I meet!—will become part of that story. I’m considering sending Deirdre O’Brien and her Colin to the magical Burren.

 

The above photo was taken last year in a magical fairy glen somewhere in the Wild West of Ireland.

But it’s not just the sites I’m looking forward to. They say a people’s heart is in their music, and I’m a firm believer in that. My collection of Irish music is extensive (some would say massive) and in listening to some of the songs of Ireland’s history, I often find myself conjuring up scenarios that eventually become scenes in a story, or backstories for a character. The Fields of Athenry is a prime example. When I was writing my first novel, In Sunshine or in Shadow, I needed a backstory for Siobhán Desmond, the heroine of the story. In listening to Athenry, I came up with a similar backstory for Siobhán, which spiralled into all sorts of conflicts for her and Rory O’Brien. I look forward to the many opportunities I know this tour will offer to hear some Irish music—and they might just spawn a story or two!

When I took the WWIT tour last year, I was incredibly impressed by all of the guides that took us to so many off-the-beaten-path places. All were so very knowledgeable about their various subjects, and all of them were more than happy to answer any questions or explain anything we didn’t understand—even to identifying the local flora! With the Clare-Connemara-Galway Tour, I can’t wait to meet a whole new set of guides who will share their knowledge, their stories, and all the wonderful little details that make the places of Ireland so fascinating.

I can’t wait to share my adventures with all of you!

Turas maith!

Cynthia

~~~

About Cynthia: I believe I was destined to be interested in history. One of my distant ancestors, Thomas Aubert, reportedly sailed up the St. Lawrence River to discover Canada some 26 years before Jacques Cartier’s 1534 voyage. Another relative was a 17thCentury “King’s Girl,” one of a group of young unmarried girls sent to New France (now the province of Quebec) as brides for the habitants (settlers) there. My late father was born in a tiny Eastern-Quebec fishing village called Irishtown. I recently had an Ancestry DNA test done, and received my results just a few days before leaving on my first Wild West Irish Tour. I learned that I have 16% Irish DNA. Perhaps that accounts for my fascination with Ireland. My passion for reading made me long to write books like the ones I enjoyed, and I tried penning sequels to my favorite Nancy Drew mysteries. Later, fancying myself a female version of Andrew Lloyd Weber, I drafted a musical set in Paris during WWII. A former journalist and lifelong Celtophile, I enjoyed a previous career as a reporter/editor for a small chain of community newspapers before returning to my first love, romantic fiction. My stories usually include an Irish setting, hero or heroine, and sometimes all three. I’m the author of The Claddagh Series, historical romances set in Ireland and beyond, and The Wild Geese Series, in which five Irish heroes return from the American Civil War to find love and adventure. I’m a member of the Romance Writers of America, Hearts Through History Romance Writers, and Celtic Hearts Romance Writers. A lifelong resident of Montreal, Canada, I still live there with my own Celtic hero and our two young adult children.

Genetic memory. It’s a popular concept these days, with so many of us searching for our ancestors. Ancestry, 23andMe, and MyHeritage are just a few examples of DNA testing services that can tell us who we are and where we come from. And naturally we feel a connection with our ancestors, wherever they hail from.

But what exactly is genetic memory?

Wikipedia says, “In psychology, genetic memory is a memory present at birth that exists in the absence of sensory experience, and is incorporated into the genome over long spans of time.” My daughter is a third-year psychology student who openly scorns the idea of genetic memory and calls it empathy.

I’m a self-confessed romantic. I write historical romance novels, and many of them are set in Ireland. Those that are set elsewhere features Irish characters. So it’s fair to say I feel a deep connection to Ireland and her people.

Writing historical fiction also takes a lot of research, one of my favorite hobbies. For my first novel, In Sunshine or in Shadow, I had to do quite a bit of research on the Famine (An Gorta Mór), because even though it was set in 1850, that terrible time cast a long shadow over my characters and their story. So in that way, of course, I developed empathy for what the Irish suffered so long ago.

When I decided to take the Exclusive Heart of the Wild West Tour, I was thrilled to read the itinerary and discover that we would be visiting a 19th Century famine village, complete with ruined cottages from the era. But I never dreamed I’d have such a strong reaction when I got there.

It was a typical lovely Irish day, with the sun and clouds indulging in games of tag and the wind blew cool and moist all around us. We approached the deserted village by a small, narrow road that led through tall, sweet-smelling grass. Finally, we arrived at the first, crumbling cottage, and I tumbled into a past I’d never known but recognized instantly.

Road to the Village

I felt a sense of anticipation as I walked toward that dead village. At first, I thought, “Oh, I’m just excited to see the place and absorb the history.” But it was more than that. I felt almost as if I were coming home after a long exile.

The Doorway

I went inside a cottage, and as I stood within its decaying walls, I felt as if I’d lived there in another time. I gazed at the empty hearth (the true heart of every Irish cottage), I thought of the nights before the turf fire, of stories told and songs sung, of kneeling to say the Rosary. I could almost taste the many meals that had been prepared there. And I knew the ladder would lead to the loft where once the children had slept soundly and dreamed sweet dreams.

When I turned back to the door, my eyes filled with tears and my throat felt tight.

I saw a woman sweeping the hearth clean, looking around one last time, maybe touching a bit of the stone wall before taking up a pitifully small bundle of possessions and crossing the threshold for the last time. There were tears streaming down her face, and sorrow burdened her heart.

At that moment, a strange shiver of awareness spidered down my spine. Who was that woman? Had I known her in another time, another life? Had we stood outside in the sunshine, watching our children play together and exchanging the latest news and gossip? Had I watched her leave, knowing we’d never see each other again?

Or was I that woman? Had my husband and children died of starvation? Were all my other relations gone? Was I setting off on this great and terrifying adventure all alone?

I’m convinced those moments in that ruined cottage were true genetic memory.

 

The Empty Hearth

But it wasn’t over yet…

My steps felt heavier as we left the famine village, my spirits lower despite the many notes and photos I’d taken (for future stories). I pulled my jacket closer around me, and it could have been a woollen shawl, threadbare and old, but the only source of warmth left to me.

I felt as if I were leaving a beloved home, as if were the one setting out to take ship from Ireland’s green shores to America, Canada, Australia or even England.

What lay ahead at the end of the road? Would I survive the terrible conditions on the “coffin ships”? And if I survived, what would this strange New World be like? Were the streets really paved with gold, would I be able to find work to keep body and soul together? Could I possibly be happy away from the mist and magical light, the emerald green and blue skies that are Ireland?

I’d like to think I’d known the woman who lived in that cottage, been her friend. And I’d like to think she did survive the journey to the New World, and that she prospered there. Maybe she fell in love, married, and had a houseful of strong, healthy children who were lucky enough to know the taste of milk, meat and eggs. Maybe she died a very old woman of 100 years or so, surrounded by her children and her children’s children.

Well, I said I was a romantic. And as a romance author, I’m constantly penning happy endings for my characters. So why not this gentle woman, too?

I have purposely left out any mention of where this famine village is located. It could be anywhere in Ireland. The stories are both the same and unique.

I love writing about Ireland and her storied history. If you’d like to check out my books, here’s where you can find me.

Connect with Cynthia on her Website, Facebook, Twitter, Google +, or Amazon Author Page

~~~

About Cynthia: I believe I was destined to be interested in history. One of my distant ancestors, Thomas Aubert, reportedly sailed up the St. Lawrence River to discover Canada some 26 years before Jacques Cartier’s 1534 voyage. Another relative was a 17thCentury “King’s Girl,” one of a group of young unmarried girls sent to New France (now the province of  Quebec) as brides for the habitants (settlers) there. My passion for reading made me long to write books like the ones I enjoyed, and I tried penning sequels to my favorite Nancy Drew mysteries. Later, fancying myself a female version of Andrew Lloyd Weber, I drafted a musical set in Paris during WWII. A former journalist and lifelong Celtophile, I enjoyed a previous career as a reporter/editor for a small chain of community newspapers before returning to my first love, romantic fiction. My stories usually include an Irish setting, hero or heroine, and sometimes all three. I’m the author of The Claddagh Series, historical romances set in Ireland and beyond, and The Wild Geese Series, in which five Irish heroes return from the American Civil War to find love and adventure. I’m a member of the Romance Writers of America and Hearts Through History Romance Writers. A lifelong resident of Montreal, Canada, I still live there with my own Celtic hero and our two adult children.

 

 

It’s almost summertime! Have you made any plans for the upcoming months of sunshine, serenity, and sightseeing? If you’re having trouble nailing down plans, consider going on an adventure in Ireland. The perfect tour for you all depends on what sort of adventurer you are and what you’d like to check off your bucket list.

Heart

If you’re indecisive and reading this because you need some clarity, consider the Heart of the Wild West, a phenomenal combination of “the best of the West”. Michael and Trish have handpicked areas of interest such as archaeological sites, beautiful beaches lined with fossils, a magnificent forest full of mythical history, and quaint towns teeming with life. Get ready for the most epic adventure you could possibly imagine. Embrace the spirit of Wild West Irish Tours and this signature tour, and you’ll be swept away to the highest sea cliffs in all of Europe; down to valleys and villages frozen in time. This trip encompasses everything you could ask for in Ireland.  The music, the magic, the magnificent sights – you name it, and the Heart of the Wild West absolutely has it.

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Open your heart of discovery during the Heart of the Wild West Tour

Iconic

If you’re looking for something truly iconic, try the Wild West Atlantic Way Tour! These are the areas you’ve seen on National Geographic or Lonely Planet. Where the untamed Irish coastline meets the ferocious beauty of her mountains. This is a tour that’s all about “the waters and the wild”; from Yeats to the greats – places such as the Aran Islands, Killary Fjord, Lough Gill, and many others mentioned in folklore and Irish history. You’ll find picturesque places; historic, heartfelt, and hands-down awe-inspiring. These are some of our absolute favorite places in Ireland – including County Mayo – where you’ll recognize backdrops from Game of Thrones, Vikings, and even Star Wars! And if you’re a real movie buff, you’ll also notice a place or two that’s a bit of a throwback to Irish film. You might want to make a trivia game as we go along the Wild West Atlantic Way.

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Rainbows appear for the luckiest travelers during the Wild West Atlantic Way Tour

Regal

Does the thought of music, folklore, and visiting enchanting islands stir your wanderlust? The Clare-Galway-Connemara Tour satisfies your thirst. You’ll feel like a king or queen in your castle. We visit a privately-owned castle. You’ll experience the heights and dazzling sights of the historic Burren and Craggaunowen Pre-Historic Park. And explore the town of Ennis, a world-renowned Irish gem. Take in iconic scenes such as Galway Bay and the Cliffs of Moher. Feel the adrenaline rush of the sea pounding against the coast and let the sweeping landscape of Ireland carry you away.

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Rolling hills of Clare and the mountains of Connemara frame the many castles in the wild west of Ireland

Home

Feel more at home on a farm than the wilderness? Our delightful Wild Atlantic Causeway Coast Adventure features a rustic array of opportunities based around County Donegal and the Inishowen Peninsula. Enjoy the quiet scenery of the farmhouse; and set forth on adventures from the magnificent Giant’s Causeway to sites that only our local storytellers and historians know about. The variety of possibilities on this tour will fulfill the most indecisive of hearts. If you’re a gardener, we know of a place filled with floral jewels as far as the eye can see. Enjoy a good hike? Explore the fantastic coastline with a romp on the beach! Historians will be right at home as you explore the cities and ancient megalithic sites. There truly is something here for everyone.

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Let your imagination guide you through each step and stone of the infamous Giant’s Causeway

Spirit

If you’re a spiritual person who’s really focusing on  “serenity”, you may want to book yourself for our upcoming autumn adventure, the Wild West Irish Pilgrimage. This tour closes out our year by celebrating the Celtic New Year; Samhain. Come for the music, poetry, meditation, yoga, healthy food, creative expression, contemplative walks, hiking, or exploring the sacred sites of Celtic Ireland with focus on traditional Celtic rituals. Get back in touch with your roots, celebrate the beauty of Irish life, and experience the tranquility of the Irish autumn. Settle in to listen to the wisdom of local guides and colleagues who have practiced in the art of Irish traditions for decades.

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Let rushing waters serenade you during your journey through the magical fairy glen

We understand. It’s hard to choose just one – don’t worry; a couple of these might just have the overlap you need to check everything off your list. You never know where the winds might next carry you. If we go off-book, you’ll find side adventures that are both seldom and wonderful. Rest assured, the Wild West of Ireland is everything you think it is and so much more.

Until next time, be well!

Sam Fishkind

Wild West Irish Tours

Social Media Manager and Scribe

My name is Cynthia Owens and I’m a proud and grateful alumnus of a Wild West Irish Tour.

Proud because I think Wild West Irish Tours are the best tours in Ireland. And grateful because my Signature Tour last May not only healed a very deep wound in my heart, it also offered me so much inspiration, I’ll have story ideas for many a year to come.

In case I didn’t mention it, I’m the author of twelve historical romance novels. My Claddagh Series stories are set in Ireland (with one memorable detour in Book III, Playing For Keeps). My Wild Geese Series is set in New York City just after the American Civil War (again, with a memorable detour, this time to Canada, in Keeper of the Light). All the heroes of that series are Irish, and all fought with Thomas Francis Meagher’s Irish Brigade.

Ireland has called to the deepest heart of me ever since I was a child. Her music, her myths and legends, have always inspired me. And when I travelled there last summer, I knew I would find inspiration on those emerald shores.

I just didn’t realize how much!

From the day I arrived in Ireland, I found stories everywhere: in the lovely, pearlescent light at dusk, the wild seas and quiet fields, the magical mist that hung over Ben Bulben each morning. And, of course, our wonderful guides. A trip to Glencar Falls on our first night evoked thoughts of W.B. Yeats and his wonderful poem, The Stolen Child, followed the next day by a trip to Drumcliffe Church and a cruise – complete with Irish music and Yeats poetry – on the Rose of Innisfree. How better to inspire a writer in love with all things Ireland?

The author, Cynthia Owens during a trip to Glencar Falls.

On another day, we visited Lissadell House, and what an amazing inspiration that turned out to be! As I walked through the magnificent house where the Gore-Booth sisters grew up, I thought of Grace Bennington, who appeared in Reluctant Betrayer (Claddagh Series, Book V). This was her house before the fire! I pictured her in the music room, climbing the stairs and pausing to gaze wistfully into the blazing fireplace. I immediately began making notes for her story, The Landlord’s Daughter.

The Lissadell House (pictured above) inspired the author to make notes for her story, The Landlord’s Daughter.

The gardens at Lissadell were just as awe-inspiring. As I strolled through paths, taking in amazing plants and flowers on all sides, catching glimpses of Lissadell Beach with its wild, gray seas, Deirdre O’Brien of the Claddagh Series, daughter of Rory O’Brien of Ballycashel House, stood next to me. A child in Coming Home (Claddagh, Book II) she grew up and became such a wonderful secondary character in Wishes of the Heart (Claddagh, Book VII), I knew she had to have a story of her own. And when I begin writing that story, tentatively titled My Lady, My Love, this summer, I plan to send her for a long stroll about magnificent gardens with her hero, Colin. And who knows? They might just fall in love while they’re there!

A long stroll through the magnificent gardens at Lissadell.

Every day of the tour brought new inspiration, new story ideas. Wandering through a magical fairy glen made me think it would be the perfect place for my heroine to visit when she wanted to escape from the world. A walk along Strandhill Beach made me think of fishermen from the Aran Islands, battling a sea storm. Ancient passage tombs brought ideas for a fantasy series I’m planning, and the story of the survivors of the Spanish Armada sent my imagination in a dozen different directions!

The author wandering through a magical fairy glen.

But even more than the wonderful research opportunities my Wild West Irish Tour afforded me, was the incredible friendliness and helpfulness of our guides. I had only to ask a question to receive detailed information on the subject. Every place we went, there was a story or a legend attached. Bram Stoker’s Dracula, a mass grave dating from Famine times, Knocknarea, where Queen Maeve is buried. And our guides knew them all. Even a simple plant had a story, especially those on Coney Island. Our guides were extremely knowledgeable about their chosen subjects, and I’m grateful for their generosity in sharing that knowledge.

I personally had some lovely discussions with Geraldine, the owner of Yeats Lodge, about an Gorta Mor, the Great Famine, as we strolled through a village abandoned more than a hundred years ago. My very first night at the Lodge, Geraldine, knowing I’m an avid reader of everything Irish, took the time to find several books she thought I might enjoy, and brought them to my room. You certainly wouldn’t find that kind of personalization on any other tour!

We Wild Westies were treated not like tourists, but as friends. And for a shy writer like me, who’s always been more of a hermit that a social butterfly, it was a wonderful experience.

I highly recommend a Wild West Irish Tour—in fact, I’ve mentioned WWIT to several friends who are considering visiting Ireland. I took the Signature Tour, and I’m hoping to gift myself with the Clare-Connemara Tour before too long.

If you’d like to find out more about my books, please visit my website. You can also find me on Facebook.

~~~

About Cynthia: I believe I was destined to be interested in history. One of my distant ancestors, Thomas Aubert, reportedly sailed up the St. Lawrence River to discover Canada some 26 years before Jacques Cartier’s 1534 voyage. Another relative was a 17thCentury “King’s Girl,” one of a group of young unmarried girls sent to New France (now the province of  Quebec) as brides for the habitants (settlers) there. My passion for reading made me long to write books like the ones I enjoyed, and I tried penning sequels to my favorite Nancy Drew mysteries. Later, fancying myself a female version of Andrew Lloyd Weber, I drafted a musical set in Paris during WWII. A former journalist and lifelong Celtophile, I enjoyed a previous career as a reporter/editor for a small chain of community newspapers before returning to my first love, romantic fiction. My stories usually include an Irish setting, hero or heroine, and sometimes all three. I’m the author of The Claddagh Series, historical romances set in Ireland and beyond, and The Wild Geese Series, in which five Irish heroes return from the American Civil War to find love and adventure. I’m a member of the Romance Writers of America and Hearts Through History Romance Writers. A lifelong resident of Montreal, Canada, I still live there with my own Celtic hero and our two adult children.

Due to popular demand, we are pleased to add some additional tour dates to our already-packed 2018 schedule! We’ve added two more Heart of the Wild West Tours (May 21-29 and August 2-10), two more Clare-Connemara Tours (June 19-27 and July 24-August 1), two more Causeway Coast Tours (August 3-11 and October 12-20), and our very special Wild West Irish Pilgrimage (October 24-November 1). Click here to see all of our 2018 tour dates and book yours! 

Monsters, The Sidhe, tragic lovers, secret caves, mystical landscapes!! Oh my!

Oh yes, our Wild West of Ireland is home to a great many myths and fairytales. So much so that we reckon you’re going to wish you had a magical bag like Mary Poppins when it comes to this next batch of colorful characters – a wee bit different from our historical cast from last time! We arise and go now into legendary territory – where even the smallest of stories can cast the most incredible shadows. Some are silhouettes of lovers cast against landscapes of raw beauty. Others are amorphous monsters who lurk out of sight just beyond the mists…

Here are six mystical beings you could take home from the Wild West of Ireland.

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Top right – the lovers’ safehaven…
  1. Diarmuid and Gráinne

In the Heart of the Wild West, there is a magnificent valley in which houses from another era rest; allowing the earth to reclaim them. We encourage travelers to raise their gaze to the magnificent cave above the valley; however – where a pair of lovers fled the wrath of a cheated Irish chieftain until the day of their reckoning came in the form of a great black boar summoned over the side of the mountains. Some say you can still see the shadow of said boar today, etched into the cliffs, waiting to return…

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Facing her enemies atop the mountain…
  1. The Queen on the Mountain

You’ve heard a lot about her majesty up on the mountain [Knocknarea], but here’s a few things you might not know until you’re standing in a megalithic site, gazing over the horizon; listening to an Irish anthropologist explain the details of a life both deified and turned to myth. Some speculate this feisty queen to have been a goddess of the Celts; while others consider her a strategist and warlord of the former ages. Regardless as to what is true and what is story, she cuts an impressive figure of indomitable strength and independence that sets a precedent for the viewing or hiking of her mighty mountain.

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Lough Gill – with a bonus figure [the Sleeping Warrior]!
  1. The Lovers and the Lough

The shining surface of Lough Gill seems to mask a great many secrets. History lies beneath its lolling, lapping waters, as do fish, and mysteries – including that of a story of another set of lovers with dozens of interpretations. As you glide over the Lough, listening to Captain George regale you with local legends, you might reflect on the one about the man who sank in the darkness; wrestling with unseen monsters in the water – whose lover gave him a sword of light to cut through the shadows. Whether or not you believe; it’s easy to imagine the sun piercing through the glossy black surface of the Lough to illuminate its enigmas below.

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Púca’s Leap(s)!
  1. The Púca

This isn’t a character you might want to take home with you – but it’s difficult to leave behind the eerie stories of the creatures who come out when the “veil” is thin. The veil, separating our world from those of the fairies in Celtic legend, is thinnest during the changing of the seasons – and perhaps felt most prominently in the Wild West of Ireland, especially in places such as Sligo [where all seems wild and free] and Connemara [with natural landmarks our guides can lead you such as the Púca’s Leap(s)]. These shapeshifting troublemakers are most definitely noted to emerge around Samhain; the end of the Celtic Calendar year – tricking unwary travelers and claiming leftovers in harvest fields. But much like the duality of the Irish lifestyle in general, some myths say this creature can be malevolent or benign. It might just depend on where you are, or how you greet it…

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Our famous Faerie Glen…
  1. Faeries

Almost everyone across the globe has stories of these beings. In Ireland these varied and fascinating individuals are known as the Sìdhe; or faeries, and much like the Púca [who some argue is also a Sìdhe] can be benevolent or malicious. Remnants of their existence erupt from the lush countryside in the form of “faery forts”, the likes of which are unlike anything you’ve ever seen. More than mere ruins, these structures are superstitiously left to the land and not to be disturbed for fear of insulting the fey – resulting in catastrophic consequences…lore of these people can be found on many of our tours, from references in Yeats’ poetry in the Heart of the Wild West all the way to the Wild West Atlantic Way…

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The fingerprints of faith…
  1. Legendary Figures of Faith

From a woman whose cloak could cover the entire countryside in order to sway a king, to a man whose existence began with the birth of a freshwater spring now renowned for healing properties; Ireland interweaves legend with faith in the form of several different saints. Imbibed stories; their wells and places of worship are some of our most special and sacred places found in the Wild West of Ireland. With spiritual guides who carefully balance the mystical with the soulful, you’ll have to discover for yourself just who walked the same roads you did, the marks they left, and what sort of pilgrimages they might’ve made for themselves and others…

If your bags still feel light after these dual adventures, be sure to stick around for another blog in the near future. And if you’d like, share with us who you’d like to meet in the Wild West of Ireland!

Until next time, be well!

Sam Fishkind

Wild West Irish Tours

Social Media Manager and Scribe

In a land of poets, powerful entities, famous saints, and timeless stories, it’s easy to imagine the figures of the Wild West of Ireland walking alongside you on a Wild West Irish Tour. When you depart; your bags might feel just a little bit fuller – with souvenirs and sentiments of good times had; but also, with the knowledge and even the people you’ve met along the way.

Here is a cast of characters historically documented to have shared the roads you’re traveling on. Walk alongside these folks and invite them home with you – so that they, through you, can tell their tales.

  1. And who better to bring home from the Wild West of Ireland than…a Spaniard? Believe it or not, this shipwrecked sailor walked the windblown dunes of Sligo, traveling toward Antrim; through Grange, lovely Leitrim, and onward into legend. Learn about him on a journey narrated by a brilliant educator who has dedicated his life to the preservation of this sailor’s history…and see how much of his tales you believe! To be fair, these stories come embellished by the sailor himself, who had quite a lot riding on his shoulders. Treasure, treachery, and old-world shenanigans await you!

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    Following the Spaniard’s path…

  2. Speaking of Sligo, therein is known a marvelous woman of great ferocity, tenacity, and strength: a groundbreaking revolutionary whose love of her country encouraged her to use her power and privilege for good. Born to a wealthy family, this Countess is tied to defying English reign in Ireland, including the Easter Rebellion and her efforts to better the lives of poorer and working classes, setting a precedent for equality [including feminism]. You’ll find a sculpture of her in the Heart of the Wild West…

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    Leading the people…

  3. Perhaps no less revolutionary in other [yet similar] aspects; Northward in County Derry is a well-known Irish poet whose style and of-the-earth demeanor set him apart from many of the poets of his time. To this day, he is one of Ireland’s most beloved figures; a humble man who used his words and his demeanor to illustrate the difficulties Ireland faced and bring light to those in rural areas or those in working classes. You may find yourself digging into the foundation of his work as you traverse along the Wild West Atlantic Way...

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    Derry’s Peace Bridge.

  4. While on the subject of revolutions and poetry, a figure in Yeats’ poetry comes to mind – the woman who rejected him no less than four times; whose radical love of Ireland surpassed, arguably, her love of anything or indeed, anyone else. Yeats of Sligo never seemed to stop loving her, but her dedication to the freeing of prisoners; of Ireland overall, and liberation of women via the Women’s Movement took precedence. You can visit her final resting place in Dublin on the final day of your Wild West Irish Tour; or hear more about her in Sligo – alongside another lady still to yet to be introduced…

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    “Under bare Ben Bulben’s head…” – W.B. Yeats

  5. If you need a breather from all this talk of revolution, we have just the fellow to introduce you to. Along the coast and flooding the hills of Ireland are the echoes of a beloved and renowned Celtic spiritualist – a title that doesn’t even begin to fully cover the concepts of poetry, philosophy, faith, and prosaic insight of a truly good-hearted man. His voice can be heard in the crashing sighs of waves outside Ballyvaughan, and in the enormity of the karst that is the Burren, resounding in the care and contemplation that comes from life in the Wild West of Ireland: raw, intimate, and deeply loving. His messages are perhaps best found in adventures to Clare-Connemara; or the very special (and spiritual) Irish Pilgrimage.

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    Following the voice of the poet…

  6. And finally, some people, no matter how real they once were, faded into legend over time – as you’ve seen now with Medb, for example, we bring you now to the much more recent story of a woman who may have inspired Yeats’ poem, “To an Isle in the Water”… Learn about the occupant of a small island in a shining lake; whose independence and determination won her the hearts of the local people – as did her infamous moonshine. You’ll hear stories of this tough and intriguing Irish lady on a cruise aboard a stalwart vessel around the enchanting lake itself; placing you in the very heart of her tale…

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    “To an isle in the water
    With her would I fly.” – W.B. Yeats

If your suitcase still feels light; or you’ve room to spare, not to worry – this is but a handful of the people you could encounter on your journey. And these are just the historical figures, after all…

You may want to stay tuned for a midweek adventure next week as we pack your bags with the more mysterious and mystical figures of the Wild West of Ireland! And if you’re familiar with Irish storytelling, their tales are boundless and numerous as the stars in the sky.

And you’ll find you can see them all the more clearly in the Wild West of Ireland.

Until next time, be well!

Sam Fishkind

Wild West Irish Tours

Social Media Manager & Scribe

As a new year dawns, humans tend to discuss thresholds, change, and resolutions – as well as lingering on the memories of the year passing; summoning celebratory nostalgia by candlelight and fireworks.

As a part of Wild West Irish Tours, from our perspective, we also focus on transformation – as we say, “you will be transformed” journeying with us, and stepping over the threshold to explore the Wild West of Ireland – from perspectives new and old.

Whether you’ve been to Ireland or are planning a visit with us in 2018, we have a lot of good recommendations. Our sample itineraries are chock full of wonderful surprises – and off the record, there’s a lot of spontaneous delights to consider. You might encounter a lively street band or pub session; perhaps listen to the stories of a Celtic wise-woman, or even submerge yourself in a crafts market nestled between the mountains and a quaint café. The road through Ireland’s Wild West is broader than you could possibly imagine – but I encourage you to try, as we recap 2017 with a couple of highlights, and prepare for 2018’s season with hopes to come!

Here’s some of what our Wild Westies reflected on regarding 2017:

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Wild Westie John Farrell; photo by Wild Westie Ron Byers
  • “The landscape scenery in both Co. Sligo and Co. Clare were my favorites. Each had their special beauty but both Counties were spectacular.” – John Farrell
  • “Serpents Rock- it was the solitude and the beauty of being in a place, not having to speak or rush… just being.” – Stacey Kinsey
  • “I’d say going out into the Burren with our tour guide, Pius. He makes it an experience, not just a place to see. And the time we spent with the Irish women who conveyed Irish folklore and some of the ancient connections among people/land/spirit.” – Saoirse Charis-Graves
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Finn himself!
  • “I loved walking down to the beach every morning and evening with Finn from our B & B in Donegal. I felt like I was in the real Ireland and just loved it!” – Mary Ellen Powrie
  • “Visiting the graves of my great-grandparents.” – Rita Byrne Tull
  • “The beautiful scenery was the best, but my favorite was the jam session withauthentic Irish Music and songs!” – Robin Winn Moore
  • “I would have to say it was a toss up between exploring the Burren with Pius and walking the cliffs of Loop Head.” – Colleen Marikje Barker
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Irish jam session – photo by Wild Westie Robin Winn Moore!

And here’s what our sojourners are looking forward to in 2018!:

  • “I hope to hear great music, see spirited dancing, taste hearty food, smell the sea, and feel the presence of something magical.” – Judy Peterson
  • “Just being there – I can’t wait!” – Claudia Pellegrini Quieroz
  • “Going back!!!!” – Terry White

From this past year, I think making new friends [I know, I know – I’m corny] and exploring new areas like Donegal were but a couple of highlights I can mention! The faerie glen as well, which was unforgettable.

As for the future, it’s definitely the possibility of new experiences – but also seeing said friends again; getting in touch with the land and its history [as well as the myths and legends], and finding new stories to hear & tell.

There are boundless opportunities for personal, mental, and spiritual growth in the Wild West of Ireland – and as one of my New Year’s resolutions, I’m trying to leave myself more open to the possibilities of said growth. I’m ready to let 2018 be a year of healing and hope! Especially when it comes to visiting Ireland.

Owner Michael Waugh threw in his two cents about the year past and year upcoming as well:

474546_3764846434164_132975841_o“Getting a chance to be shown the areas like the Burren and the Holy Wells this past year; finding new areas that no one knows about this past year – that’s just one aspect, though,” says Michael. “It’s hard to choose just one.” When it comes to the upcoming year, he’s delighted to be bringing people fresh experiences close to home: “We’re looking forward to the new Wild West Atlantic Way in particular – bringing people to what we consider the ‘best’ places of the four tours.”

“We love developing new tours and showing people these places dear to our hearts,” adds Michael. “Seeing everything from Clare out to the Antrim Coast; Connemara, Sligo – what we’d say is the best of Ireland.”

And, if you’re like a few of our Wild Westies who said “I wish” or “it’s not in the cards this year” [shout-out to Wild Westies Ann DesRoches and Cynthia Owens], there is always a time in the future you can take a journey with Wild West Irish Tours.

Please stay tuned with us as we enter 2018 with light hearts and enthusiastic adventures; eyes on the horizon of the Wild West of Ireland.

You might not know what to expect from the rest of the world, but we can promise you as always, you can expect great things in simple places with us.

Until next time, be well!

Sam Fishkind

Wild West Irish Tours

Social Media Manager & Scribe

Knocknarea.

The sound of stones being clacked together; the feeling of mist curling between grassy knolls, the sheer slick of mud beneath a traveler’s boots, and the bite of cool mountain air with just a splash of the sea. If one were to listen closely, one might hear the whispers of battle-song and chanting on the wind – echoes of a past as mythical and enigmatic as one can possibly imagine.

There are few places wilder in the Heart of the Wild West than this mountain – a towering tribute to ages past and the legends of a warrior queen who held her own against countless men. If one were to believe the stories; atop that mountain sits a cairn, or burial chamber, of said warrior queen: Medb.

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That bump at the top of the mountain? Medb’s cairn!

It’s befitting as one climbs the mountain to consider the origin of such a woman; such a name: Medb [Maeve when anglicized] supposedly comes from the early Celtic language “Medu”, or “intoxicating”. Thus she becomes “she who intoxicates” – and as a figure who had many lovers and whose mysticism survives beyond the grave, it’s fitting. But her name could also be derived from the ancient Celtic term for “ruler”; or “Medwa”. Either way feels fitting as she still seems to rule the area – and enchant travelers to venture up her mighty mountain to visit her final resting place at the top.

The wildness of the mountain and its mighty cairn of wishing-stones [we’ll get to those later] perpetuates Medb’s untamable spirit. Existing supposedly around the first millennium CE; her archaic imprint in Western Ireland is prominent. She was said to be fierce as she was fair and legends morph her into a sovereign goddess as much as she might’ve also been a queen. Whoever she was, her cairn remains, watchful and ominous in the West.

10479397_770931282926920_2741803950303110057_oWild Westies who’ve hiked Knocknarea on a Wild West Irish Tours adventure describe the experience as “magical”, “spectacular”, or even “transformative”. Adjacent to this is the fairy glen below, which some of you might remember from a couple of previous segments, here and here! It might be Medb’s impact or the ferocity of unbridled nature, but the hike up Knocknarea is unforgettable.

“There’s a great sense of ‘Presence’ on the mountain, in my opinion,” says Wild Westie Saoirse Charis-Graves. “I found even the trail up the mountain to be mystical in that it felt like there were energy signatures all along the way.” Such a thing can be felt in places such as Carrowmore and around fairy forts – even the most skeptical have been said to experience something out of the ordinary. It may be the telling of the tales regarding Medb and the fair folk, being surrounded by things and nature older than a visitor might be used to, or simply finding oneself more open in the Wild West of Ireland. Difficult to say – every person has a unique experience.

“And of course, there is also the occasional faery tree,” Saoirse adds. “Then, at the top, circumambulating the cairn and taking in the 360-degree panorama…one guide in particular helped me understand the people who had come before. One feels that, too: the history, the overlay of people from a long distant past.” Whether Medb is indeed atop Knocknarea; buried beneath 40 feet’s worth of stones, upright and facing her enemies as oft told or not, it seems unlikely that any visitor can dismiss the power felt atop the mountain.

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Wild Westie Tara atop Knocknarea!

Perhaps again, it’s the triumph of the hike or the age of the earth there, but the rawness and regality of Knocknarea is unparalleled. In fact, Wild Westie Tara Leigh Accavallo’s first mountain hike happened to be Knocknarea – an “exhilarating” experience, she says, adding, “there are no words that do justice to the views from along the way up and at the top.”

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Wild Westies cast their stones atop Medb’s cairn!

Wild Westie Steve Hogan has hiked the mountain twice already – “it is a tradition to carry a stone to the top and leave it on Maeve’s Cairn,” he notes – a tradition that comes with a notion that one can make a wish or prayer as they toss the stone atop the enormous cairn. In a way, there’s an energy in adding your own history to somebody else’s – be it the hundreds who laid stones there before, or the impact of a legend. “We did the climb right after visiting the Glen,” adds Steve, “and that along with being the only ones ascending Knocknarea that April afternoon made it quite a magical experience.” Wild Westie Debbie Walker-Spies had an interesting interpretation of her journey: “I climbed it in 2015 on a day so windy I imagined Maeve was trying to blow me off of her mountain. It was fabulous!”

Perhaps Medb does want to test travelers visiting her mountain – as she tested her enemies and men of olden days. The reward for completing the trial of the hike [which is actually quite accessible, like all things, weather permitting], however, is one of a breathtaking view and the purest form of history: up close, beautiful, and indeed, incredibly wild.329540_458629680823750_2056127544_o

Whether you just enjoy the challenge of a hike, exploring the history of the Wild West of Ireland, or are a true believer of the mystic & mysterious, Knocknarea has something for everyone. The Heart of the Wild West and Wild West Irish Tours are delighted to bring visitors to the cairn and the glen; as well as countless other places to be explored in the future, either on your own journey or here in our words…

Until next time, be well!

Sam Fishkind

Wild West Irish Tours

Social Media Manager & Scribe

 

When it comes to the Wild West of Ireland, there is plenty to be surprised about.

But according to our alumni “Wild Westies”; or people who travel with us on a Wild West Irish Tour, nothing is more surprising than these top three [technically four] things:

  1. The Fairy Glen

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Nestled against the bosom of Knocknarea, accessible to locals and those who know the area well, this niche of fantasy sparks the imagination with possibilities. It is one part enchanting hiking trail, another part unexpected mystery. Enormous trees older than time itself part to allow visitors safe passage through winding paths and sunlight-drenched thickets. Golden hues find their way amidst the greens, and the grand finale is an open cleave through the mountain itself that looks as though some great machine shaped a tunnel through the wilds.

A few swings and signs of life likewise exist there, a soft wind blowing the prior in gentle sways. All are welcome to partake of the swings, as well as take a moment in reflective silence to listen to the songs of nature. Perhaps you’ll encounter one of the “good neighbors” here – or simply achieve the tranquility that comes from a trip outdoors to the rare and wonderful landscape of Western Ireland. Take a peek here in the “Outdoors” segment of our virtual Heart of the Wild West!

  1. The Horsehoe Walk *

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Perhaps one of our most iconic stops along the Heart of the Wild West Tour is that of the Gleniff Horseshoe. This particular area is a perfect balance of history and Celtic legend – expressing the duality of the Irish people in that it holds a great amount of tragedy and a great deal of hope for the future, all at the same time. The cavernous mountains incite stories of two lovers on the run; who hid in the grandest of caves overlooking this sweeping valley until the end – and the valley itself, filled with the skeletal remnants of buildings from days past; famine houses, and roaming sheep, evokes a sense of the forlornly breathtaking.

Words almost fall short of describing the epic quest that is a stroll through this area – walk in contemplation to a heart-shaped waterfall, stop to examine what history left behind, and learn from local guides the different aspects of the Horseshoe as you go along. You can catch a glimpse of it here in our “Outdoors” segment as well if you have a sharp eye!

  1. A Secret Island *

461551_455585314461520_731874806_o.jpgUnparalleled in many ways, tying in second with the Horseshoe [according to our Wild Westie alumni poll] is our incredible hidden gem of Inishmurray…or not so much a gem; singular, but a veritable treasure chest of various gems, from the amethyst flowers in the springtime; to golden blossoms later in the year, to the silvery-gray stone and the greenness perpetual.

Beautifully-preserved archaeological sites such as a monastery and family homes from the 6th century dot the landscape like stony Easter eggs. Exploring the island at your own pace is a wonderful way to absorb the history all around you – Wild Westies skim cerulean waters by boat to roam the paths after chatting with local and informative guides [such as our friend Auriel Robinson of Seatrails] about what they’ll be seeing. Wild Westies are given free range to roam the island until it’s time to return to their B & B – though many would probably want to stay in such a peaceful, open place…for now, though, you can visit Inishmurray virtually right here.

  1. And finally: the food!

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It may surprise you to learn that Irish food is nothing like the “dreaded” things some might have come to expect of the U.K. [which may also not be the case]! That being said, you probably arrive in Ireland expecting corned beef and cabbage. Potatoes. All sorts of stereotypical things.

In reality, I can happily report I myself have personally had dishes such as butternut squash and bleu cheese soup [pictured above]; a Southwestern chicken panini [no joke!], full; hearty Irish breakfasts [thanks especially; B & B keeper and friend Geraldine!], honeycomb ice cream on the side of a magnificent mountain, the best “chips” [re: French fries in America]; arguably, and so much more. Ireland is not limited to the flavorless concepts of old. On the contrary, the food I’ve had in Ireland has been some of the best and most luscious I’ve had in my life – many I’m sure would agree, and DO agree, judging by the results of our poll!  Here’s a look at the local cuisine aspect of the Heart of the Wild West…

Have you been to the Wild West of Ireland? What surprised YOU the most? Feel free to share this with a friend as you embark on your own Wild West Irish Tours adventure –

We can’t wait to show you even more surprising things.

All you can really expect is great things in simple places.

Until next time, be well!

Sam Fishkind

Wild West Irish Tours

Social Media Manager & Scribe